Traumatic Brain Injury

You’ll find helpful information below for several of the specific disorders categorized generally under Traumatic Brain Injury.

Concussion & Mild Head Injury

How long will it take me to recover from a concussion? - ¿Cuánto tiempo me llevará recuperarme de una conmoción cerebral?

When you have a concussion, it is common for MRI or CT scans to come back as “normal.” This does not mean there is no injury.

Cuando tiene una conmoción cerebral, es común que las imágenes de resonancia magnética o tomografías computarizadas vuelvan como “normales”. Esto no significa que no haya lesiones.

Click this link to read the newsletter

Haga clic en este enlace para leer el boletín..

Brain Waves: Good vibes for the Arkansas Brain Injury Community - Ondas cerebrales: buena vibra para la comunidad de lesiones cerebrales de Arkansas

We are excited to present the FIRST EDITION of Brain Waves, a newsletter for the Arkansas Brain Injury Community! Click the link below to view the newsletter. Feel free to download copies to share. To request printed copies or to be added to our newsletter mailing list, please email us at atrp@uams.edu.

¡Nos complace presentar la PRIMERA EDICIÓN de Brain Waves, un boletín informativo para la comunidad de lesiones cerebrales de Arkansas! Haga clic en el enlace de abajo para ver el boletín. Siéntase libre de descargar copias para compartir. Para solicitar copias impresas o para agregarlas a nuestra lista de correo del boletín, envíenos un correo electrónico a atrp@uams.edu.

Click this link to read the newsletter

Haga clic en este enlace para leer el boletín

Mental Health Disorders Common Following Mild Head Injury

A new study reveals that approximately 1 in 5 individuals may experience mental health symptoms up to six months after mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), suggesting the importance of follow-up care for these patients. Scientists also identified factors that may increase the risk of developing post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and/or major depressive disorder following mild mTBI or concussion through analysis of the Transforming Research and Clinical Knowledge in Traumatic Brain Injury (TRACK-TBI) study cohort. The study was supported by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), part of the National Institutes of Health. The findings were published in JAMA Psychiatry

Click this link to read the Guidelines.

NY State - Updated Guidelines for Concussion Management (June 2018)

The New York State Education Department Guidelines for Concussion Management in Schools have been revised to reflect the current recommendations on managing concussions. Previous guidance was that students must be completely symptom-free to return to activities. Now there is emerging research suggesting that some symptoms may be acceptable during return to activities. The updated guidelines now reflect this practice along with emphasizing that schools follow the guidance of the student’s health care provider on what symptoms are acceptable for return to activities. A gradual return to physical activity typically is done by progressing a student through levels of activity that increase in duration and/or intensity

Gradual return to activity should occur with the introduction of a new activity level every 24 hours. If any post-concussion symptoms return, the student should stop the activity and drop back to the previous level of activity. Current research suggests that some level of symptoms with activity is acceptable. Therefore, schools will need to follow provider orders on return to activities. Students should be monitored by district staff daily following each progressive level of physical activity, for any return of signs and symptoms of concussion. A gradual progression should be followed based on the private healthcare provider’s or other specialist’s orders and recommendations.

Click this link to read the Guidelines.

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